Seniors on CCHS Life and New Beginnings

By Rebecca Maynard

Members of the Clarke County High School (CCHS) class of 2020 never imagined they would finish their classes at home after school was canceled in mid-March because of COVID-19, but are making the best of a difficult time. On May 28 and 29, an in-person ceremony for the school’s approximately 170 seniors was held outdoors in Wilbur Feltner Stadium. Physical distancing guidelines were followed, and a time slot was reserved for graduates to be presented their diplomas and have their photographs taken. The individualized ceremony lasted about five minutes per graduate.No more than 10 people were allowed on the football field at a time, including staff and family members, and some of the school’s graduation traditions were included, such as photo opportunities with the Shepherd’s Crooks, which each graduating class traditionally walks underneath. A number of graduating seniors shared their thoughts on distance learning, future, and memories of their time at CCHS.

“It was awful adjusting, and coping with knowing you won’t have your senior prom with your friends or a real graduation,” said Clara Davidson, who plans to attend University of Sydney. “But it was all the little moments we lost, such as lunch in the senior court, spring sports senior night, seniors’ last day where you leave early and go around saying goodbye to everyone and signing yearbooks. Those were the hardest to lose.” “Learning from a distance was not hard, but it felt like a chore. I realized how much I enjoyed school once I was no longer going every day,” Davidson said. “Everyone always looked forward to homecoming week, and the best one by far was winning the spirit stick senior year,” she said. “Lunch in the senior court was a privilege you got during your final year, and that was so great. It was just the seniors, and we all got so close during those lunches, goofing around, making plans for the weekend, talking about our futures. I will always remember some of those days. They were ordinary, but that’s what made them so special.” 

“Distance learning honestly made classes easier,” said Hayden Hartsell, who plans to attend gunsmithing school and college for mechanical engineering. “We could complete the work at our own pace, and as long as it was turned in biweekly, everything was fine, which caused much less stress and rush.” Hartsell particularly enjoyed the agriculture program and FFA. “I learned so much there, and had a great time doing it.”

Colby Childs plans to attend Hood College in the fall to major in business and continue his baseball career. “Distance learning wasn’t too bad other than internet problems at our house at times,” Childs said. ”I absolutely missed being in school with friends and teachers, especially my senior year. Missing out on my senior year of baseball with guys that I’ve grown up with was very hard to take.“It has been a great four years overall,” he said. “Winning the Bull Run District title in baseball my sophomore year and the Bull Run title in football my senior year was awesome! Breaking the school’s career, single-season, and single game passing records was something that I will never forget. I would like to thank all my teachers and coaches for a great four years at Clarke! GO EAGLES!”

Faith Compton’s future goals involve traveling around the world as much as possible, and she says the pandemic has affected her interests greatly. “It was hard adjusting to online school and the stay at home order, but I understand it was for the best to keep everyone safe,” Compton said. ”My time at CCHS has brought me many good memories, especially being part of the Clarke County Winter guard teams.” 

Emmie Jo Aiello plans to attend Virginia Tech in the fall to major in neuroscience.  “Hopefully I get to live on campus for the first semester, but due to the coronavirus, I don’t know if that is possible yet,” she said. “COVID-19 has definitely altered my path in taking steps to college. Choosing a college, filling out paperwork and learning about the process without the help from my college and guidance counselors has been difficult. I had to do all this while quarantined in my house! “Adjusting to the unusual circumstances was definitely a challenge,” Aiello said. “Hearing that I was not going to have a senior prom, a regular graduation or even finish the rest of my senior year was devastating. My heart aches for those who didn’t get to finish their spring sports season. Having our classes online was weird for sure. I live well out of town and my wifi out here is pathetic so completing assignments out here was not easy. However, the teachers and principals of Clarke made it a lot less stressful and they would work things out with me and my siblings to make sure we could get it all done!”

Riley Marasco plans to attend the University of Virginia in the fall and study human biology. As of now, UVA is still planning on having students in the fall, but the pandemic has affected classes and things will be different, assuming nothing changes and students still get to go.“Transitioning to distance learning was definitely super new and different than what we have done before, but it wasn’t too bad,” Marasco said. “We had already used Google classroom a lot, so it was pretty easy to keep up with assignments and things. I think it just put some more responsibility on us as students to keep up with our work and check our emails and classroom to make sure we get everything done.“I have so many memories at CCHS,” Marasco said. “I am going to miss seeing my favorite teachers there every day and all of my friends. I am very thankful for all the high school has done for me to get me where I am today.”

Lauren Gibson plans to attend University of Georgia in August to major in Animal Science and minor in Agribusiness on the Pre-Veterinary Medicine track to obtain her DVM. She will also be enlisting in the US Army Reserves to serve time while in school until she gets her DVM and can enlist in active duty, as she aspires to become a US Army Veterinarian. “As of right now, UGA is saying there will be on campus fall classes; however, if that were to change due to the pandemic then I will be deferring a semester to LFCC until they resume on campus classes in order to save money,” Gibson said. “At first it [school closing] was exciting because I’m not one to enjoy being inside when it’s nice out and usually dread the last couple months of school anyways, but when I found out that I’d never be able to walk the halls of CCHS again and say a proper goodbye to my teachers, admin, and friends, it hit me hard,” Gibson said. “The saying that you never know what you got ‘til it’s gone is so true for the class of 2020 and it’s hard realizing we’ll never get a ‘normal’ ending to our childhood.”

“Memories are made of these little things like late nights at cheer competitions, football games, and basketball games, because we never played anyone close to us!” Gibson said. “Little things like baking bread for FFA, leading sermons with FCA, giving back to the small town Berryville community through Interact Club and NHS, and holding an officer position for SCA. Things like trying out track, or learning how to play steel drums. Making friends with the ladies in the kitchen who fed me everyday! Knowing what teachers you can go see no matter what happens, good or bad, like getting a good grade on a test or just wanting a snack or losing a friend to a car accident and needing someone to be there, just being able to go to those people no matter what for eight hours a day, five days a week for anything, that’s what means the most. “Watching all the people you’ve known forever grow up and accomplish amazing things and form big dreams, watching the spark in them ignite when they get to tell you all about it. All the events of homecoming week, powder puff volleyball and football, and prom, make up the little things. All these little memories will stick with me as well as the rest of my fellow graduates and friends for the rest of our lives. There’s a reason for everything and as John 13:7 says, “Jesus replied, ‘You may not understand now what I am doing but someday you will.’”

#Classof2020Strong.

Chris Shipe Named Veteran Of The Year

The “Berryville-Clarke County Veteran of the Year” award is given to local veterans who exemplify the tradition of the citizen soldier, whose dedication to the nation and their communities does not end when their military service is complete. The 2019 recipient is Chris Shipe.

After graduating from Bloomburg University of Pennsylvania in 1983, Chris Shipe served in the U.S. Army from 1983 to 1987. Stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, and in Germany, he served with the elite 2nd Armored Division whose motto is “Hell on Wheels.”

For most of his professional career, Shipe has worked with mutual insurance companies in Pennsylvania, Iowa, West Virginia, and Virginia, where he was directly involved in the leadership and governance of cooperatives. In 2003, he was named president and CEO of Loudoun Mutual 
Insurance Company. 

Chris Shipe and his wife 
Diane live in Berryville, where he has served in various capacities on insurance cooperative boards and industry 
committees, including as the chairman of the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies’ Property Casualty Conference. Shipe serves on the Rappahannock Electric 
Cooperative board of directors and is currently its president.

Shipe, 58, has been a volunteer firefighter since he was 16-years old. He continues to run calls, serving Berryville and Clarke County residents as a volunteer with the John H. Enders Fire and Rescue Company. He has been Enders president for 10 years. In his spare time Shipe enjoys restoring old fire engines.

Shipe is also a lay leader and chairman of the Duncan Memorial United Methodist Church Administrative Council. A talented musician, he is an active member and vice president of the Clarke County Community Band. He supports many local community 
organizations through service and financial contribution.

Previous “Berryville-Clarke County Veteran of the Year” recipients are Norman deV. Morrison (2015), the late John F. Harris (2016), Michael L. Linster (2017), and Robert A. Freebee (2018). Their names are  on a perpetual plaque located in the Berryville-Clarke County Government Center. Chris Shipe’s name will be added to the plaque.

Oak Hart Farm Expands Produce and Pantry

Shawna Hartsook sums up the aim of her family farm in simple terms: “I want to keep people shopping in their community.” Oak Hart Farm, which expanded this year to offer a larger store with an expanded variety of goods from spices to grains, to coffee and kombucha, serves as a curator of local and regional produce and pantry items.

They also farm rows and rows of their own chemical-free vegetables, herbs, and flowers, an enviable sight alongside the gravel road leading to the store. Oak Hart sells fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs (chicken and duck), and dairy items from several local and regional farms – including sauerkraut and kombucha to appeal to the pucker-lovers.

And their “low waste” ethos permeates the store, where shoppers are encouraged to bring their own bottles, jars, and bags. Bulk items for sale include olive oil, vinegar, and a host of cleaning supplies. All products are carefully researched and vetted for sustainability, and Hartsook stands strong in her insistence on chemical free products across the board.
On a recent visit to the new store, I felt a nice, slow-down vibe hit me, as apparently did several customers who wandered in and out of the store and shared in conversation. It’s as if someone opened up her own well-kept pantry, with so much to please the senses, and said, “Come on in and stay a while.” You might find something tasty if you do.

Each week Oak Hart’s website posts available produce offerings from their market. This week you’ll find kale, chard, beets, potatoes, turnips, and lots more. Hours of operation and offerings can be found at https://oakhartfarm.com/market.

Oak Hart Farm is located at 822 Shepherd’s Mill Road, Berryville, VA 22611.

Hanging with the Presidents

If a visit to Mount Vernon is in your summer plans, be sure to take a close look at the pictures hanging in the full-scale restoration of the grand Front Parlor. Curators painstakingly recreated the room down to the smallest details. The gilded frames holding the Washington family portraits were handmade by Berryville’s own Peter Miller, a highly skilled carver, gilder, conservator, and restorer. He creates one-of-a-kind frames using the same traditional methods used by 12th and 13th century craftsmen.

Miller was contacted by a Mount Vernon curator to craft 13 historically accurate frames. These replicas were essential because some paintings are too valuable to be put on public display, some original frames did not survive, and some paintings are owned by others. After extensive research and trips to photograph and take exacting measurements, Miller and his apprentice and assistant Christian Ferrante produced the ornate hand-carved and gilded frames.

Miller has also crafted frames for pictures in the George W. Bush Presidential Library. They hang in a floor-to-ceiling recreated Oval Office, the only recreation of the Oval Office in the world.

Originally from Connecticut, Miller learned to work with wood as a child, serving as his father’s eyes and additional hands. His father was a wood shop teacher in the 1940s–50s as well as a hobbyist, but lost his sight when Miller was just a year old. “He continued to work in his home shop,” Miller recalled. “My first tasks were sanding for him and cleaning his brushes. Eventually, I learned to use a drill press.”

Miller didn’t do any woodworking in high school, and gave no thought to a career in the field. In fact, he had no idea what he wanted to do, so his guidance counselor advised him to go to a business college. “I got a bit of business, accounting, economics,” he said. “It wasn’t for me.”

He gave woodworking a second look and switched to another college, where he majored in teaching woodworking, in what was called industrial technology. However, he never did teach, deciding that, “I couldn’t teach in the public school system and build birdhouses for the rest of my life!”

After college, he went to work drafting and engineering for New England Log Homes, then for a millwork company doing cabinetmaking, drawing, engineering and estimating. However, it was a family business and he could advance no further with them. He started thinking of what he could do on his own, and framing was a viable option. A family member had a framing business and he went to work for them.

He started his own business in 1983 in a small frame shop that had been established a few years before. “All they had been doing was typical ‘walk into a frame shop and see the stuff you would order from distributors.’ Then one day a client asked, ‘Do you ever get or work with closed corner frames?’”

Miller explained that with ‘closed corner’ or ‘finished corner’ frames, all of the work—the joinery, carving, etc.—is done prior to any finishing, resulting in a frame that looks seamless. “That was the kickoff point for me,” he recalled.

He began seriously learning more about hand-made frames and became enthralled with gold leaf. “The community I got involved with, The International Society of Gilders, is primarily in the USA but with members around the world. These are the people who taught me to gild. I went in there as a newbie and took workshops and studied with some of the finest gilders in the United States for many years, and I still take classes.”

He added that most of the work he does is focused around frames, but he also does furniture. In addition, he does architectural gilding—he gilded the crosses at the Episcopal Church in Berryville.

Christian Ferrente, 22, was working on an ornate wall bracket that will be gilded. “I’ve been working here a little over a year. I’ve been doing woodworking since the summer after high school, taking whatever cool opportunity came my way, and I’ve been lucky enough to do some pretty awesome jobs. I did a little bit of gilding, but just very basic. I got referred to Peter. There are very few people around that know gilding like Peter does, so I’m here, learning.”

“Christian doesn’t boast,” added Miller, “but he has done timber framing at Mount Vernon, and a little over a year working at the National Gallery in the Conservation Department.”

Miller explained that they use very old traditional techniques. “One of the things I’m most passionate about with gilding and this entire art form is that virtually nothing has changed since the Renaissance.” He pulled out a translation of a book on techniques and materials written by an Italian craftsman in the 15th Century. “Our tools are the same, nothing has really changed, even the formulas and recipes.”

Miller offers occasional classes and workshops on frame-making and gilding.

P.H. Miller Studio is located at 1 East Main Street, Berryville. For information, visit www.phmillerstudio.com or call 540-955-3939.

As the Crow Flies

For A More Successful Nesting Season

Story and photo by Doug Pifer

I’ve put up seven bluebird houses at various sites on our property. For the past couple of years, bluebirds have nested in them and successfully raised a brood or two of young. Tree swallows have also used them. When I clean out the nest boxes in late winter, I’m happy to have enhanced some of the wildlife habitat of this small plot of land.But successful nesting is far from certain. Over the three years since we’ve installed new fences, the barn cats have learned to walk on the top boards as if on balance beams. Now they can routinely investigate every bird house that’s mounted on a fence post. Red foxes, raccoons, snakes and other ground predators have learned to keep an eye on nesting boxes, waiting to grab eggs, nestlings, or even adult birds. Hawks and owls patrol the skies day and night.

Alternative nest sites
It’s easy to install bird houses on fence posts, and such sites are attractive to birds such as tree swallows and bluebirds. But studies of nesting bluebirds have shown that over time, fence post nests may be less successful. They offer predators a safety lane across an open field where they can hide, hunt and ambush nesting birds. And if all the bird houses are in the fence line, the nests are set up for failure. A safer alternative is to place some bluebird and tree swallow houses on free standing, non-climbable posts. Mount bird housing on metal fencing T-posts, PVC, or metal conduit pipe cut to appropriate lengths. Positioning them ten or twelve feet from a woods or fence line makes the nests less accessible to predators.

Installng baffles
Bird houses mounted on posts in open areas are even safer from predators if a baffle is provided. A baffle can be anything that allows the nesting bird easy access but excludes a predator. You can buy one or make it yourself. I put a pre-made baffle on the post supporting the wood duck nesting box I placed next to the creek. It resembles an upside-down funnel about two feet in diameter. A raccoon or blacksnake trying to climb up to reach the wood duck eggs will be truly baffled! Professional wildlife managers 
recommend using such baffles on every wood duck nesting box.After reading literature by the Purple Martin Conservation Association (PMCA), I learned that the telescoping metal pole that holds my martin house is climbable by snakes and raccoons. Last season I bought and installed a custom-made metal baffle to protect my martin colony. Great horned owls also can reach their talons into martin houses and grab nestlings. The PMCA sells owl guards that fit in front of martin house openings to prevent such predation, but I have yet to try them.

Predator guards
To further protect bluebird houses, attach to the entrance a 2.5- to 3-inch-thick square of wood, drilled with a hole the same size as the opening. A cat, owl or raccoon won’t be able to reach the birds in the nest with its paw or talons. To also discourage snakes, attach a simple tube of bent wire mesh extending from the entrance five or six inches. The outermost edge of the mesh is cut and bent outwards so the sharp wires deter a hungry snake. Bluebird predator guards are available online or at stores that sell backyard bird feeding and housing supplies.

The Berryville Beat

My, what a busy month March was for us Town Council members!We began our budget work in earnest during our daylong March 12 budget work session. We have advertised a tax rate of 20 cents per $100 of assessed value for the upcoming fiscal year 2020, which runs from July 1 to June 30, 2020. This tax rate is an increase from our current fiscal year’s rate of 19 cents. However, we agreed to advertise the higher rate in order to give us flexibility to see what we can afford in the upcoming year’s spending plan. It is worth noting that, legally, we cannot adopt a tax rate over what is advertised, but we can adopt a rate under what is advertised, so keeping the tax rate level is indeed a possibility.

With any adopted rate and budget as a whole, we need to consider our needs for future planning and rising costs, particularly in construction, without a considerable growth in the tax base.

There are several noteworthy items that we are considering for funding in fiscal year 2020: renovation of the playground in Rose Hill Park; creation of a deputy town manager position to assist our town manager and be the point of contact for the Public Works and Utilities departments; replacement of a police department cruiser.Also, as of this writing, we have set aside funding for the three budget goals adopted by the council in the last quarter of 2018: funding for police department accreditation; matching funding, along with the Clarke County Board of Supervisors, for a study on the extension of Jack Enders Boulevard; and funding for a branding and marketing study of the town, which would enable us to know our target markets to grow our tax base and foster economic growth.We will adopt the budget and tax rate at our June meeting.

We welcome all public input at our upcoming budget public hearing, set for May 14.

Another matter before us in March was the findings of a study regarding our utility system. This study recommends increases in both our water and sewer rates to pay for the costs of the system over the next five years. Many of these increases stem from high anticipated capital costs, with a very good possibility that we will be eyeing a significant renovation, if not altogether replacement, of our water treatment plant. That cost, alone, hovers north of $11 million. The consultant who prepared the report is also recommending an increase to our fee for new water connections, but a decrease to sewer connection fees.As  much as all of us would like to avoid utility rate increases, the high capital costs, quality mandates we must adhere to, as well as our low user base, means that we must find a way to fund our system to make sure it provides adequate service for years to come.A point of emphasis — our water and sewer funds are enterprise funds, meaning that they must be self-supporting. These funds have zero impact on our general fund, which is funded by our real estate and personal property taxes. So, an increase to water and sewer rates has no bearing on tax bills, and vice versa.The report, which is available on our website (www.berryvilleva.gov) provides useful information including growth rates of neighboring jurisdictions compared to ours, monthly usage analyses, and historic data on our utility rates.We always welcome and encourage public input. If you are not able to make it to a public hearing or the Citizens’ Forum at one of our meetings, please feel free to email us your thoughts.This monthly column is authored by the members of the Berryville Town Council. For information on town government, including meetings, agendas, and contact information for the Town Council and town staff, visit www.berryvilleva.gov.

Around Clarke County

Farmers Market Opens With Live Music and Petting Zoo
The Clarke County Farmers Market is starting strong this season with The Sweet Nola’s Po’ Boys providing live New Orleans style jazz music on opening day, Saturday, May 4. The Bar C Ranch petting zoo will also be at the market.The market offers fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, crafts and baked goods every Saturday morning, May through October, from 8am to 12pm in the town parking lot on South Church Street in Berryville. Enjoy something new every week as produce comes into season. “This is only my second season with the Clarke County Farmers Market but I have been overwhelmed by the excellent vendor participation and community support that this market receives,” said market manager Karie Griffin. “We have a great group of vendors who form our market executive committee and they put in a lot of effort every year to make each week a great experience for everyone, lining up great local music and family friendly events. I’m honored to be a part of it.”Visit the market’s Facebook page, Web: clarkecountyfarmersmarket.com; Email: 
manager@clarkecountyfarmersmarket.com.

April

12–14 Quilt Show
Clarke County Parks and Recreation Center. 225 Al Smith Circle. Berryville. Northern Shenandoah Valley Quilt show will be held. For details, visit www.nsvquiltshow.com

13 Fundraiser Dinner
Boyce Volunteer Fire Company. 1 S. Greenway Ave. Bake sale during dinner. Free will offering. 4–7pm. 540-837-2317.

13 Downtown Berryville Yard Sale
Various locations in downtown Berryville. Begins at 8am. Contact Berryville Main Street for details at 540-955-4001.

13 Easter Egg Hunt
Clarke County Parks and Recreation’s Lloyd Field. 225 Al Smith Circle. Berryville. Bring a basket and don’t forget the camera for when the Easter Bunny hops in. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be held inside the Senior Center side of the Recreation Center. $3 per child, tickets can be purchased in advance at the Recreation Center (cash, check & credit) and day of at Lloyd field (cash & checks only). Ages 1–2, 11am, 3–4, 11:20am, 5–7, 11:40am. 540-955-5140.

13 Rose Hill Chamber Orchestra Debut Performance
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. The finest musicians in the area perform. 8–10pm. $20 in advance, $25 at door, 12 and younger free.
www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

14 Community Conversations:  Common Ground
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. A trained moderator will oversee a discussion open to all residents and designed to help people from different backgrounds and viewpoints connect and better understand each other. 4–6pm. Free.
www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

14 Talk and Book Signing With Jesse Russell
Long Branch Historic House and Farm. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. Clarke County native and local history expert Jesse Russell will discuss his new book, “Juliet: From Slavery to Inspiration.” Refreshments prior to talk. $10 ahead, $15 at door. 6pm.
540-837-1856.

14 Sunday Wellness Series:
Brain Matters!Sanctuary Wellness Center. 208 N. Buckmarsh St. Berryville. Registered medical herbalist Geo Giordano presents issues of the brain relating to toxins, diet and lifestyle, and solutions will be discussed and the video interview “The End of Alzheimer’s” will be shown. $20 with pre-registration, $25 at door. 2–4pm. 410-707-4486. info@sanctuaryberryville.comwww.sanctuaryberryville.com

18 Physical Therapy for Vertigo
WorkshopBerryville Physical Therapy and Wellness. 322-A N. Buckmarsh St. Learn about this troublesome condition and various forms of treatment. Free interactive session with questions and answers at end. 540-955-1837. 6:30pm.
www.berryvillept.com/vertigo-workshop.

19 Reiki Share
Sanctuary Wellness Center. 208 N. Buckmarsh St. Berryville. Led by Amy Hope-Gentry. $10 per person. 7pm. awww.amyhopegentry.comwww.sanctuaryberryville.com.

Saturday April 20 Easter Egg Hunt
Historic Long Branch. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. Carriage rides, moon bounce, face painting, petting zoo, Jordan Springs Market barbecue and more. 12–4pm. Adults $5, kids younger than 12 free. 540-837-1856.

20 Spring Craft Show
Chet Hobert Park. 225 Al Smith Circle. Berryville. More than 75 crafters and artisans will offer unique, handcrafted products. Show moves into recreation center in case of rain. Free admission. 9am–5pm. 540-955-5147.

20 Bumper Jacksons Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Early jazz and country with a unique, DIY style. Dance party after concert. Dinner at 6pm with Jordan Springs barbecue for sale, concert at 7pm. $20 in advance, $25 at door, $30 at door for seated and dance party tickets. www.barnsofrosehill.org
540-955-2004.

21 Community Pancake Breakfast
John Enders Fire Hall. 9 S. Buckmarsh St. Berryville. Come support your fire and rescue squad and enjoy the finest pancake breakfast in the area. Adults $8, children $4, children 5 and younger free. 7am–12pm. 540-955-1110.

21 Blue Ridge Hunt Point to Point Races
Woodley Farm. 590 Woodley Lane. Berryville. First race at 1pm. Easter egg hunt, antique car show, Nantucket Beagles on parade and more. $25 per car, $150 for VIP tailgate parking. 540-631-1919. diana.perry@viasatinc.com.

23 Community Meal
Boyce Volunteer Fire Company. 7 S. Greenway Ave. Free meal prepared by county churches on the fourth Tuesday of every month. 5:30pm. Contact Eleanor Lloyd at 540-247-6311.

25 Soul-Full Community Meal
Duncan Memorial United Methodist Church. 210 E. Main St. Berryville. 13 local churches get together to provide a meal open to all in the community the fourth Thursday of each month. Free. 5:15–6:30pm. 540-955-1264.

25 Winedown Yoga
Historic Long Branch. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. Led by Amy Hope-Gentry. Contact Amy for details and to register. 5:45–7:45pm. amyhopegentry@aol.comwww.amyhopegentry.com. www.sanctuaryberryville.com.

26 Patron’s Night Art at the Mill
Burwell Morgan Mill. 15 Tannery Lane. Millwood. Enjoy drinks and hors d’oeuvres as you preview and purchase art. 6–9pm. Tickets are $65 a person and available at www.clarkehistory.org or 540-955-2600.

27 Spring Spaghetti Dinner
Boyce Fire Hall. 7 Greenway Ave. Fun, food and fellowship with takeout plates available. Free will offering benefits Boyce United Methodist Church Ministries. 4–7pm. 540-336-3585. 540-409-7197.

27 Art at the Mill Opening Day
Burwell Morgan Mill. 15 Tannery Lane. Millwood. Runs through Sunday, May 12. 250 artists display for sale over 1000 works of art in a historic 18th century, operating mill. Saturdays 10am–6pm, Sunday–Friday 12–5pm. Adults $5, seniors $3, children 12 and younger free. 540-837-1799.

27 Bud’s Collective Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Powerful group of pickers from the hills of West Virginia in the bluegrass tradition. 8–10pm. $15 in advance, $25 at door, 12 and younger free. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

27 World Tai Chi Day
Chet Hobert Park. 225 Al Smith Circle. Berryville. Led by Adrian VanKeuren. Participate in demonstrations, experience grounding and chi flow and learn how Tai Chi can bring stability to your life. 9–11am. www.worldtaichiday.org
www.sanctuaryberryville.com.

27 Lyme Alive Support Group
Sanctuary Wellness Center. 208 N. Buckmarsh St. Berryville. Adrian VanKeuren leads with the topic of preventing Lyme and tick-borne illnesses. 2–4pm. taichiavk@gmail.com. www.sanctuaryberryvillecom.

28 At Eternity’s Gate Film
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Film explores the world and mind of Vincent Van Gogh. 4–6pm. Members $5, nonmembers $8. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

28 Guided Historic Tours
Historic Long Branch House and Farm. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. Led by Colette Poisson, who worked with the previous owner. Adults $8, children younger than 12 free. 12–4pm. 540-837-1856.

28 Cooking Demonstration
Four Forces Wellness. 424 Madden St. Berryville. Nutritionist Christine Kestner will show how to make a whole food, plant-based lifestyle work. Samples and recipes to take home included. $20. Register ahead. 2pm. 571-277-0877. christine@4forceswellness.com. www.sanctuaryberryville.com.

29 Yoga Fundamentals Class
Sanctuary Wellness Center. 208 N. Buckmarsh St. Berryville. Four week class led by Amy Hope-Gentry. $65 per person for the series. Register ahead. 11am–12pm. amyhopegentry@aol.com. www.sanctuaryberryville.com.

30 Jarlath Henderson Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Youngest ever recipient of BBC Young Folk Award, who featured on the soundtrack of the movie Brave, performs. 8–10pm, Jordan Springs barbecue sold before show. $20 in advance, $25 at door, 12 and younger free. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

May

3 Artist Opening Reception ( DATE IN PRINT VERSION IS INCORRECT)
Historic Long Branch. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce.
Reception and artist talk with Isabelle Truchon, who will exhibit paintings from the ROAM collection. Refreshments served. Free. 6–8pm. 540-837-1856.

3 Folk Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Lloyd Martin and Vox perform folk music with ukulele, mouth trumpet, hand percussion, bass, finger-picked guitar and harmony. 8–10pm, Jordan Springs Barbecue available ahead for purchase. $15 in advance, $20 at door, 12 and younger free. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

3 Wild Edibles Festival
Watoga State Park. 4800 Watoga Park Rd. Marlinton, W.V. Geo Giordano is keynote speaker at festival with foraging hike, vendors, demonstrations, live music and more. 3pm. www.wvstateparks.com/event/wild-ediblesfestival.
www.sanctuaryberryville.com

4 Farmers Market
Season Opening Day Town parking lot next to Dollar General. 20 S. Church St. Berryville. Food trucks, Bar C Ranch petting zoo, live music and many vendors selling meat, produce, cheese, vegetables and much more. 8am–12pm. clarkecountyfarmersmarket.com.

4 VHSA Horse and Pony Hunter Show
Sandstone Farm. 3805 Millwood Rd. Millwood. Call for details. 540-837-1261, or day of show 540-532-2292.

5 Blue Ridge Singers Concert
Christ Church. 809 Bishop Meade Rd. Millwood. The Blue Ridge Singers will perform under the direction of Dr. Jeff Albin. Light refreshments served afterward with meet and greet with performers. Free, suggested donation $10. 4pm. 
540-837-1112.

5 Fiesta in the Garden
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. On Cinco de Mayo, join Sustainability Matters and Lord Fairfax Soil & Water Conservation District for a Fiesta of sustainable gardening. 1–4pm. $30 in advance, $25 for Barns or Sustainability Matters members, $10 for children. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

7 Trivia Night
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. The Clarke County Historical Association and the Clarke County Library team up once again to bring live team trivia. Categories include History, Movies, Literature, Science and more.  Prizes donated by local area businesses. Barn doors open at 6:30 p.m., trivia begins at 7pm. Free. 540-955-2004. www.barnsofrosehill.org.

10 Hiroya Tsukamoto Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Internationally acclaimed guitarist and composer takes us on an innovative, impressionistic journey filled with earthy, organic soundscapes that impart a mood of peace and tranquility. 8–10pm. $15 in advance, $20 at door, 12 and younger free. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

11 Angela Marchese
Concert Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Soprano Angela Marchese is a passionate and versatile artist whose “rich, burnished voice” has thrilled audiences both locally and abroad. 8–10pm. $20 in advance, $25 at door, 12 and younger free. www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

11 Horse Fair
Historic Long Branch. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. 4H all-breed horse parade, demonstrations by local experts, expo, food and drinks and more. Admission to Saddle Up! Museum exhibition and art show included in ticket price. $5 per person, children younger than 12 free. 12–4pm. 540-837-1856.

16 Karan Casey Band Concert
Barns of Rose Hill. 95 Chalmers Ct. Berryville. Karan Casey has long been one of the most innovative, provocative and imitated voices in Irish traditional and folk music. 8–10pm. $25 in advance, $30 at door, 12 and younger free.
www.barnsofrosehill.org. 540-955-2004.

Ongoing

Art at the Mill
Burwell Morgan Mill. 15 Tannery Lane. Millwood. Runs through Sunday, May 12. 250 artists display for sale over 1000 works of art in a historic 18th century, operating mill. Saturdays 10am–6pm, Sunday–Friday 12–5pm. Adults $5, seniors $3, children 12 and younger free. 540-837-1799.Farmers MarketSaturdays, May–October, 8am–12pm. Town parking lot next to Dollar General. 20 S. Church St. Berryville. Many vendors selling meat, produce, cheese, vegetables and much more. 
clarkecountyfarmersmarket.com.

Bradley Stevens Art Show and Sale
Long Branch Historic House and Farm. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. An exciting opportunity to purchase work by renowned Virginia contemporary realist painter and portrait artist Bradley Stevens. Through April 22. 540-837-1856. 
info@visitlongbranch.org.

Yoga at Long Branch
Thursdays, 5:45pm. Historic Long Branch. 830 Long Branch Lane. Boyce. Vinyasa Flow class has you move at a sweet and mindful pace. $20 to drop in or ask about class passes. 540-837-1856. www.visitlongbranch.org.

Alcoholics AnonymousTuesdays, 8:15–9:15pm. Grace Episcopal Church. N. Church St. Berryville. 
AAVirginia.org. 540-955-1610.

FISH Clothing Bank and Food Pantry
36 E. Main Street. Berryville. Open Wednesdays 9am–12pm and Sunday 2–5. 540-955-1823.

Bingo
Boyce Fire Hall. 7 S. Greenway Ave. Thursdays at 7pm, Sundays at 1:30pm. Proceeds benefit the volunteer fire department. 540-837-2317.